Hollow Viscus Injuries Due To Trauma

Hollow Viscus Injuries Due To Trauma

Keywords: Hollow viscous injury, blunt injury abdomen, Ultra Sonography

Abstract

Background: Hollow viscus injuries can be due to traffic accidents, fall from the height, and fall of heavy objects leading to trauma. Abdominal trauma is the most common with Injuries pertaining to Gastro-Intestinal tract from the cardiac end of the esophagus to the anus, gall bladder, and biliary tract and lower genitourinary tract. The aim of the study is to study the modes of trauma, clinical features of hollow viscus injuries, and the diagnosis and management of hollow viscus injuries. Subjects and Methods: This was a hospital-based cross-sectional study. conducted over a period of one year from June 2018 – May 2019. at Department of General Surgery on 90 patients with hollow viscus injury. After initial resuscitation of the trauma victims, a careful history was taken to document any associated medical problem. The collected data was analyzed with respect to the presentation by the patient’s age and sex incidence, etiologies, pathological features, morbidity, and mortality associated with causation and management. The ultrasound and CT- Scan were done to assess the injury and plan accordingly before taking up for the surgery. Results: The majority of the patients belonged to the age group of 21 – 30 years and the least pertaining to the age group of 41 – 50 years of age group. The Incidence in Males is much more than females. The males were 74% and females were 26%. The most common causative agent of hollow viscous injury was a Road traffic accident with 59%. Majority of the patients who were admitted more than 24 hours after the injury, the mortality rate was much higher compared to the patients who were admitted in less than 24 hours of the trauma. Conclusion: HVI is a dangerous condition. High mortality rates represent the seriousness of HVI and related injuries. Patients of HVI should be carefully monitored for associated injuries and complications.

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Published
2020-07-05