Association of Serum Iron and Ferritin Levels in Patients of Cholelithiasis: A Cross-Sectional Study

Serum Iron and Ferritin Levels in Patients of Cholelithiasis

Keywords: Bile, Cholelithiasis, Serum cholesterol, Serum ferritin

Abstract

Background: Cholelithiasis is a common abdominal disorder resulting in increasing hospital admissions. About 10-12% of adults develop gallstones. Aim of this study was to find out any association of serum iron and ferritin levels in patients of cholelithiasis. Subjects and Methods: Present study was conducted at the department of surgery, tertiary care institute of for the period 1 year. For the study purpose 70 gall stone cases and 70 normal healthy matched controls were taken as study participants. After explaining about the study to the subjects, an informed consent will be obtained, followed by a detailed history with clinical examination with more emphasis on the parameters given below in outcome variable (ultrasonography finding, serum iron level, serum ferritin level, serum cholesterol). Results: The mean age in the case group (gallstones present) is 43.12 years, as compared to the control group the mean age is 41.05 years, The study shows in the case group 64% of patient was female and 36% was male and in the control group 76% of patient was female and 24% was male. In this study 46 (65.7%) patients with gallstones have the value of serum iron less than normal (normal value: >40 µg/dl). Our study shows, there are 35 female patients with gallstone disease who have serum iron levels below the normal value Most of the patients with gallstone disease whose serum iron levels are subnormal are females. Our study shows that the mean serum iron between cases and control was statistically significant p 0.05. There is no effect of anemia on serum cholesterol. In this study the mean serum cholesterol between cases and control was statistical insignificant (p>0.7)) In the case group, 20 of male and 36 of female patients have normal serum ferritin levels. The number of females having normal serum ferritin levels (in both case and control groups) is more. Conclusion: Gallstones are more prevalent in female population than males. Serum ferritin association is insignificant as it increases other condition with inflammation also. Low serum iron level associated with high risk of cholelithiasis as this may lead to super saturation of bile.

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Published
2020-05-26