Evaluation of Diabetic foot treatment and complications: a clinical analysis in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

Evaluation of Diabetic foot treatment and complications

  • Anil Kumar Assistant Professor, Department of General Surgery, World College of Medical Sciences Research and Hospital, Jhajjar, Haryana, India
  • Arinjaya Jain Assistant Professor, Department of General Surgery, World College of Medical Sciences Research and Hospital, Jhajjar, Haryana, India
  • Shyam Sunder Nagpal Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery, World College of Medical Sciences Research and Hospital, Jhajjar, Haryana, India
Keywords: Complications, Diabetic foot, Neuropathy, Ischemia, Foot amputation

Abstract

Background: Over time, diabetes can affect your nerves and blood vessels. Diabetes-related nerve degeneration can lead to the amputation of a foot. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to diabetes. It’s a worldwide problem. Diabetes mellitus is becoming more common over the world. A diabetic patient’s lifetime risk of developing a foot ulcer is between 12 and 25 percent. Subjects and Methods: In total, 76 cases were studied. A thorough history, clinical examination, wound or ulcer, and a pre-designed proforma were used to collect data. Wagner’s classification, exam results, blood tests, a renal function test, a wound swab, an X-ray, and the treatment administered were all obtained. All patients are examined, and clinical results are documented on a case sheet. Data is analysed, relevant tests are run as necessary, and therapy is given. Results: The majority of diabetic patients with foot lesions in the 76 instances reviewed were between the ages of 55 and 65 (32.9%), followed by 65 and 75 (26.3%). The youngest patient, 33 years old, presented with an abscess on the (R) forefoot, whereas the oldest, 77 years old, was admitted for cellulitis of the entire forefoot. There were 58 (76.3%) male patients and 18 (23.7%) female patients in the study. The majority of the patients had diabetes for 7-10 years 21. (27.6 percent). Conclusion: In summary, ulcers were the most prevalent presenting lesion, followed by gangrene and cellulitis. The dorsum of the foot was the most commonly affected area, followed by the forefoot and toes.

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Published
2021-11-30